HEY LOOK WHOSE BACK...

Posted on June 28, 2011 by Furls Business Academy | 2 Comments

ME. After a whole bunch of end of school craziness, I’m finally back, crafting, and businessing. On Sunday I went to my good friend Annie’s house and we did a sweet photo shoot of 22 crochet hooks and some honey dippers.

I’ll post the group photos here of both hooks and dippers but you’ll have to check out Furls for the individual shots.

So these beauts made of live oak, water oak, and redbud (from left to right) and are made to the same exacting standards of super smoothness and food and organic friendliness as usual. The REALLY exciting thing about these dippers is that they come from a wonderful wood vendor in Katy, Texas who practices sustainable collecting of naturally fallen trees. SO THESE PUPPIES ARE RECLAIMED AND UPCYCLED, which always makes me feel good. On the other hand, these crochet hooks come from a variety of exotic and tropical locations.

 We got some Ebony from Gabon, Cocobolo from Mexico, Tulipwood from Brazil, Black and White Ebony from Laos, and Cherry Burl from Northwest USA. These guys have obviously been keeping me busy for quite some time, but I’m able now to rocket out quite a few in a day. 

Since I was worried about making so many crochet hooks from tropical woods, which I know are a VERY finite resource, I wanted to make this process resource-positive. So for every crochet hook that is purchased, we donate money to ensure the planting of one tree in a tropical rainforest in Southeast-Asia. Since one hook uses much less wood than one tree, this should be very good for strengthening our global environment! (which makes me happy)

They come in quite a variety of shapes and sizes, from 3.5mm to 8mm hooks and from 4.25” to 5.5” long and, as Annie captured, the range of colors is wonderful! The idea behind the design is that conventional crochet hooks cause quite a bit of wrist stress and hand tensions BECAUSE the bodies are so thing that you have to over flex the muscles and tendons that control your upper knuckles. Hence the chubby teardrop shape of these curvaceous bodies, which allow your hand to grasp comfortably without over-flexion. Also, the ornamentation on the tail is designed to allow a resting place for the pinky and ring finger, which on a conventional hook often are left “hanging loose” and can cause knuckle stiffness. 

All of these have been posted up here and are ready for shipping! SPEAKING OF, I finally have to time to mail a crochet hook to a very good friend of mine DAINTYLOOPS. I’m hoping that she likes it and hope to be posting again soon! (All photos by Annie Melton)

Posted in Craft, Crochet, Crochet Hook, Dipper, Honey Dipper, Hook, Organic, Reclaimed, Sustainable, Wood, Woodturning, Woodwork

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2 Responses

Hazim
Hazim

November 24, 2012

Such pretty tecpuas! Great photos. I love browsing in antique shops there’s a cute one in the EShed markets in Freo and I have plans to go shopping one morning in North Fremantle and browse through all the antique shops there hoping to score a bargain!

Nadeem
Nadeem

November 24, 2012

Hi i thought i prttey much had this crocheting thing down but im into my 9th or 10th row, and now it is starting to fold up, what am i doing wrong???? Im trying to make a blanket and it isnt working

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