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July Amigurumi CAL Moth Invasion Week Two

Posted on July 22, 2017 by Brenna Eaves | 0 Comments

Hello again Furlers, Happy (almost) National Moth Week! It's Brenna from Little Raven Fiber Arts and you better believe I've got some more fun moth facts for y'all! Did you know moths can range in size from smaller than a pencil tip to bigger than a songbird? The largest known moth in the world, the Atlas Moth, has a wingspan of almost a foot! Big fluffy friend!

My moths are really quick and easy to make and I've had so much fun picking color combos from my stash, so I hope you all have fun with this one, too!

Keep an eye on the Facebook Group because I'll be posting my moths along with you this month (and if you've got any questions, I'm always there to help)! 

In case you missed it, here is the supply list.

 

Notes

• The legs are worked as part of the body of the moth, no sewing them on later! 

• I've included two different antennae options, either crocheted in thread or just using some scrap yarn.

• When working in rows (for the wings), I do not chain 1 when I turn and I work directly into the first sc of the turned row. Keep that first stitch relatively loose so you don't have to sweat to get the hook through when you come back to it the next row (this is my personal experience as a tight stitcher, you may not have this problem). 

 

Troubleshooting 

• If your little legs don't line up as shown below, you can easily adjust their alignment by working them one or two stitches before or after the pattern indicates. Everybody's stitches spiral differently when working in the round, if this happens to you, it's nothing to worry about!

• If the wings curl instead of easily lying flat (some yarns will do this), you could try using a stiffener (see a few ideas here). I have not tried this myself: if my wings curl, I just make new ones with a different yarn *shrug*. Does that qualify as lazy?

 

All good? Let's go!

 

Body  

ch 2 or magic loop

1.   6 sc in 2nd ch from hook / magic loop (6)

2.   *3 sc in 1st sc, sc in next sc* rep *-* around (12)

3.   sc in 1st sc, in BLO sc in next 2 sc, both loops sc in next sc, in BLO sc in next 3 sc, both loops sc in next sc, in BLO sc in next 2 sc, both loops sc in last 2 sc (12)

4.   in FLO, *2 sc in 1st sc, sc in next sc* rep *-* 2x, 2 sc in each of the next 3 sc, sc in next sc, rep *-* 2x (19)

5.   2 sc in 1st sc, sc in next 6 sc,  *ch 4, slp st in 2nd ch from hook and in each of the last 2 ch* (leg made), sc in next 4 sc, rep *-* (leg made), sc in last 8 sc (20)

6-8.  sc in each sc around (20)

9.   sc in 1st 6 sc, sc dec, sc in next sc, *ch 4, slp st in 2nd ch from hook and in each of the next 2 ch* (leg made), sc in next 4 sc, rep *-* (leg made), sc in next sc, sc dec, sc in last 4 sc (18)

10.   sc in 1st 15 sc, sc dec, sc in last sc (17)

11.   *sc dec, sc in next sc* rep *-* 2x, sc in last 11 sc (15)

12.  sc in 1st 3 sc, sc dec, sc in next 2 sc, *ch 3, slp st in 2nd ch from hook and in last ch* (leg made), sc in next 3 sc, rep *-* (leg made), sc in next 2 sc, sc dec, sc in last sc (13)

STUFF the body firmly

13.  sc dec, sc in next 5 sc, sc dec, sc in last 4 sc (11)

14.  sc in 1st 9 sc, sc dec (10)

15.  sc in 1st sc, *sc dec, sc in next 2 sc* rep *-* 2x, sc in last sc (7)

STUFF the body a little bit more so it doesn't have a sad tail end

16.  sc dec x2

FO, use the yarn end to close up the hole. Weave in or 'lose' the yarn end in the body of the moth.

Little moth grub done!

Let's give them wings!

  

Wings (upper)

Make 2

ch 2

1.   2 sc in 2nd ch from hook, TURN (2)

2.   2 sc in 1st sc, sc in last sc, TURN (3)

3.   sc in 1st sc, 2 sc in next sc, sc in last sc, TURN (4)

4.   2 sc in 1st sc, sc in last 3 sc, TURN (5)

5.   sc dec, sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc, sc in last sc, TURN (5)

6.   2 sc in 1st sc, sc in last 4 sc, TURN (6)

7.   sc in 1st 4 sc, 2 sc in next sc, sc in last sc, TURN (7)

8.   sc in 1st 5 sc, sc dec, TURN (6)

9.   sc in 1st 3 sc, slp st in next sc, TURN (4)

10.   skip slp st, sc in next sc, sc dec, TURN (2)

11.   work 5 sc across (this requires a sc in the slp st from row 9 and then a sc in the same sc as the slp st from row 9), slp st in last sc (6)

FO, weave in only this end, do not weave in the beginning tail!

To get distinct left and right wings, just flip one over. 

Using the beginning tail, sew only the tops of the upper wings to the moth body at about round 4 (see picture). I always pin them on first to make sure they're aligned in relation to the little legs so I don't end up with the Leaning Moth of Pisa. 

Weave in or 'lose' the yarn ends in the body.

 

Wings (lower)

Make 2

ch 2

1.   2 sc in 2nd ch from hook, TURN (2)

2.   2 sc in 1st sc, sc in last sc, TURN (3)

3.   sc in 1st sc, 2 sc in each of the last 2 sc, TURN (5)

4.   sc in 1st sc, 2 sc in next sc, sc in last 3 sc, TURN (6)

5.   sc dec, sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc, sc in last 2 sc, TURN (6)

6.   sc in 1st 4 sc, slp st, TURN (5)

7.   skip slp st, sc in next 2 sc, 2 sc in next sc, sc in last sc, TURN (5)

8.   work 7 sc across (this requires a sc in the slp st from row 6 and then a sc in the same sc as the slp st from row 6), slp st in last sc (8)

FO, weave in only this end, do not weave in the beginning tail!

Again, for specific left and right wings, just flip one over. 

Using the beginning tail, sew only the tops of the lower wings to the moth body at about round 9 (see picture). They should be closer together than the upper wings. 

 

Feathered Antennae

(like my Mothman!)

((( Cryptid spotted )))

Make 2

With crochet thread and size 7 steel hook, ch 10

1.  slp st in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next 2 ch, hdc in next ch, dc in each of the next 2 ch, tc in next 2 ch, 5 dc in last ch, turning the work upside down so you're working along the bottom of the ch, tc in next 2 ch, dc in next 2 ch, hdc in next ch, sc in next ch, slp st in next ch (same ch as 1st st). 

FO and weave in this tail only! 

Thread your yarn needle (yes, yarn needle) with the beginning tail of the antennae and attach them to the head as pictured above. I don't tack mine down with too many extra stitches, I essentially just pull the tail through and then 'lose' the end in the body of the moth (hence the yarn needle: a regular needle will catch on your yarn and it'll be nearly impossible to 'lose' the end cleanly). If this moth is intended for use as a toy, however, make sure those antennae aren't going anywhere and sew it firmly in place. 

 

The Easy Antennae

With scrap yarn and yarn needle, insert the needle through the underside of the moth and pull the scrap yarn through but leave a few inches sticking out. Make sure your yarn needle does not catch on any stitches of the body when you do this.

Weave the scrap through the body a few times (the 'lose' the yarn end technique) to secure it. I pass it through about 4 times before I can pull the yarn snug and it doesn't shift the bit sticking out.

Bring the needle through the body to poke it out on one side of the head and trim yarn to desired length, then trim the bit sticking out and tuck it away!

Repeat on the other side.

 

Eyes

Using your fabric paint, dab on some eyes and allow them to dry.

 

Yay, you're done! Now go confidently forth into National Moth Week, Furls friends! 

 

If you have any questions, comments or corrections regarding this pattern please feel free to contact me (littleravenfiberarts@gmail.com), I’m here to help.

Make sure to pop in to the Fun With Furls Facebook Group and the Ravelry Project page to share your moth photos and admire everyone else’s crochet handiwork too! 

Happy Crocheting! 

Brenna

 

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Previous July Amigurumi CAL Supply List and Preview - Moth Madness!

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Furls Crochet Team

November 9th, 2016

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