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Free Crochet Triangle Shawl

Posted on March 05, 2019 by Lorene Eppolite | 0 Comments

 

Bronwyn Shawl

Explore the range of crochet with the Bronwyn Shawl, designed by Toni of TL Yarn Crafts. This pattern begins with just 5 stitches but grows through rows of stripes, lace, and texture. Finish off your shawl with one of two border options to add a personal touch.

 

ABOUT OUR DESIGNER

Hi friends! I’m Toni, the designer, and instructor, behind TL Yarn Crafts. I strive to inspire other's creativity through online tutorials and modern crochet patterns. I learned to crochet from my mother as a teenager and have been exploring the possibilities of yarn ever since. My current design obsessions are delicate shawls and cozy sweaters. 

When I’m not crocheting, you can find me cuddled with my 2 kittens and husband at home, binge-watching the latest true crime thriller on Netflix. Follow my crochet journey on TLYCBlog.com and find my patterns and maker gifts on TLYarnCrafts.com.  

Instagram / Pinterest / Ravelry

I’m so excited to crochet with you! Join me in the Furls Crochet Facebook group, Fun With Furls, to share your projects and get help.

 

SUPPLIES

-Furls Odyssey White & Rose Gold Crochet Hook – US I/9 5.5mm

-We Are Knitters The Baby Wool, worsted #4 weight (100% Baby Alpaca; 123 yards per 1.75 ounce/ 50 gram ball)

-CA – Grey (250 yards, 3 balls)

-CB – Mustard (500 yards, 5 balls)

-CC – Spotted Blue (250 yards, 3 balls)

-Scissors

-Yarn needle

-Locking stitch marker (for Border Option 1)

-5.5mm interchangeable knitting needle tip or cable needle (for Border Option 1)

A note on choosing yarn: The 100% baby alpaca yarn used for the original shawl sample adds to the drape and luxurious feel of the final piece. If you choose not to use baby alpaca, 100% Merino wool in DK weight would be a comparable substitute. DK weight yarn in another fiber will help you achieve the finished size but may result in a stiffer finished shawl.

 

PATTERN DETAILS

Finished Size
Wingspan – 82”; depth – 28”

Gauge
4” = 21 rows x 16 sts in single crochet, unblocked

 

Stitch Abbreviations

Ch(s) = chain(s), FPdc = front post double crochet, Hdc = half double crochet, Hdc2tog = half double crochet the next two stitches together, Rep = repeat, RS = right side, Sc = single crochet, Sc2tog = single crochet the next two stitches together, Sk = skip, Sl st = slip stitch, Sp = space, St(s) = stitch(es), WS = wrong side, Yo = yarn over

 

Notes

- Portions of this pattern are written in crochet shorthand. For example – “2hdc” means to 2 hdc in the next st (increase made) and “hdc 2” means hdc in each of the next 2 sts.

- Numbers in parentheses at the end of some rows indicate the total number of stitches in that row.

- Where possible, work over yarn ends to prevent having to weave in so many later.

- Turning chains at the beginning of rows do not count as a stitch.

 

PART ONE

This week we are working the first and section sections of the Bronwyn Shawl. Be sure to pay attention to the color changes in the pattern. 

Section 1 

Row 1: Using Color A, ch 5, sc in 2nd ch from hook and next ch, 2sc in each of the last 2 sts, turn. (6)

Row 2: Ch 1, 2sc, sc across to last 2 sts, sc2tog over last 2 sts, turn. (6)

Row 3: Ch 1, sc across to last 2 sts, 2sc in each of last 2 sts, turn. (8)

Row 4: Ch 1, 2sc, sc across to last 2 sts, sc2tog over last 2 sts, turn. (8) 

Rep Rows 3 and 4 until working row has 58 sts (ensuring you finish with a Row 4 repeat). 

Section 2 

Row 1: Using Color B, ch 1, sc across to last 2 sts, 2sc in each of last 2 sts, turn.

Row 2: Using Color A, ch 1, 2sc, sc across to last 2 sts, sc2tog over last 2 sts, turn.

Row 3: Ch 2, hdc 2, (ch 1, sk 1, hdc 1) to last 4 sts, (ch 1, sk 1, 2hdc) 2 times, turn.

Row 4: Ch 1, 2sc, sc in each hdc and ch-1 sp across to last 2 sts, sc2tog over last 2 sts, turn. 

Rep Rows 1-4 11 total times. 

PART TWO

Section 3 

Rep Rows 1-4 of Section 2 13 times or until you run out of yarn, replacing CA with CC

 

Section 4 

Change to CB

Row 1 (WS): Ch 2, hdc across to last 2 sts, 2hdc in each of last 2 sts, turn.

Row 2 (RS): Ch 2, 2hdc, (fpdc 1, hdc 1) to last 3 sts, fpdc 1, hdc2tog over last two sts, turn.

Row 3: Ch 1, sc across to last 2 sts, 2sc in each of last 2 sts, turn.

Row 4: Ch 2, 2hdc, hdc 2, (fpdc around the hdc 2 rows below, hdc 1) to last 3 sts, fpdc around the hdc 2 rows below, hdc2tog over last 2 sts, turn. 

Rep Rows 3 and 4 until Section 4 measures 8” along the decrease edge, ensuring you finish with a Row 4 repeat. 

 

PART THREE

For the final section of our shawl, pick one of the two border options. 

Border Option 1 – Crochet I-Cord 

 

This is an applied border that is worked perpendicular to the shawl edge. It is inspired by the stretchy and textured I-cord bind off traditionally found in knitting. You’ll need the knitting needle or cable needle mentioned in the supplies section, as well as the locking stitch marker and crochet hook. 

When working Border Option 1, it’s important to keep your tension loose and comfortable throughout. If you find your tension to be too tight, try switching to a larger hook or try Border Option 2 instead. 

Cut yarn. Join border color with sl st in first st of row with RS facing. 

Step 1: Ch 4, pull up a loop in the back bump of the 2nd ch from hook and each remaining ch (4 loops on hook), pull up a loop in the next st on shawl edge (5 loops on hook). 

Step 2: Transfer 4 loops onto knitting needle, place 5th loop onto a locking stitch marker. 

Step 3: Transfer one loop from needle to hook, ch 1, transfer next loop from needle to hook, ch 1, transfer remaining 2 loops from needle to hook, pull up a loop in both sts together (3 loops on hook), pull up a loop in next st on shawl edge (4 loops on hook). 

Step 4: Transfer three loops from hook to needle, ch 1, transfer next loop from needle to hook, ch 1, transfer remaining 2 loops from needle to hook, pull up a loop in both sts together (3 loops on hook), pull up a loop in next st on shawl edge (4 loops on hook). 

Step 5: Repeat Step 4 for all loops on shawl edge. Transfer 2 sts from hook to needle, sl st loops on hook, (transfer next loop from needle to hook, sl st loops on hook) 2 times, cut yarn leaving a 4” tail, pull loop up and out of work. DO NOT WEAVE IN END YET. Drop knitting needle – it is no longer needed. 

Step 6: Insert hook into marked stitch at beginning of I-cord. Sl st in live loop of I-cord on WS across row. After last sl st, sl st 4” tail through loop on hook, pull loop up and out of work.

 

 

 

Border Option 2 – Bobble Border 

 

This more traditional crochet border uses chain stitches and a cluster to produce medium-sized bobbles that sit close to the shawl edge. To complete this border, you will only need a crochet hook. Depending on the finished number of stitches on your shawl, you may have to make adjustments to this stitch pattern, which is a multiple of 3 + 1. 

-Pattern St: Double crochet 5 together (dc5tog) – yo, insert hook into st, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull through 2 loops on hook, (yo, insert hook into the same st, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull through 2 loops on hook) 4 times, yo, pull through all 6 loops on hook. 

Cut yarn. Join border color with sl st in first st of row with RS facing. 

Step 1: Ch 3, dc5tog in 1st ch made. 

Step 2: Sl st in next 3 sts on shawl edge. 

Repeat Steps 1 and 2 across shawl edge, finishing with the following in the last st: Repeat Step 1, sl st in same st. 

Finishing – Cut yarn, weave in all ends, and block to finished shape.

 

Be sure to use the #BronwynShawl hashtag and tag @TLYarnCrafts when you share your shawls on Instagram!

 

 

 

 




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